Faculty Club / Wellness / What Should a Culture of Caring Look Like in Higher Education?

What Should a Culture of Caring Look Like in Higher Education?

Participants in this panel discussion explore strategies for building a culture of caring in higher education classrooms.

Participants in this panel discussion explore strategies for building a culture of caring in higher education classrooms.

Building a Sense of Belonging and Support

šŸ”µ Gabriella felt cared for by a professor who reached out before the course started to understand their learning needs and summarized their input as a community, creating a sense of belonging and support.

šŸ”µ Building a culture of caring in higher education requires a focus on solidarity rather than charity, emphasizing the mutual benefits of support and empathy.

šŸ”µ Starting every class with a check-in and showing genuine care for students’ well-being can help create a culture of care in higher education.

“People need one thing more than anything else, the reassurance that they are a priority.”

šŸ”µ Creating a culture of care in higher education requires adjustments to ensure that students feel cared for and connected, regardless of whether they are physically present or in different modalities.

šŸ”µ Students in higher education are facing mental health challenges, and it is important for institutions to be adaptable and reflective in order to support their well-being.

Self-Reflection and Educator Identity

šŸŸ£ The speakers’ decision to be transparent about their relationships and disclose the layers of relationship within the classroom community helped create a sense of vulnerability and transparency among students.

šŸŸ£ “Maybe there’s something that you tried in an effort to demonstrate some care” – The speaker suggests that educators should be open to adjusting their strategies based on student feedback to create a culture of caring in higher education.

šŸŸ£ The importance of self-reflection in higher education and the need for professors to identify and address the barriers that prevent them from showing up as the educators they aspire to be.

šŸŸ£ The importance of self-reflection for instructors in creating a culture of caring in higher education.

šŸŸ£ The impact of identity and how educators show up in the classroom can greatly influence their relationship with students and the overall learning experience.

Active Participation and Collaboration

šŸŸ¢ “We want everyone to be engaged with what we’re going to be discussing today as well as with each other.” – Emphasizing the importance of active participation and collaboration in fostering a culture of caring in higher education.

“When you talk about caring, it looks like good being done together.”

šŸŸ¢ Abolishing the feeling of “us versus them” in the classroom promotes collaboration and a culture of caring in education.

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